THE VALUE OF EDUCATION TO INDUSTRY


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Modern industry would soon revert to its primitive or medieval domestic type if it is not sustained and backed by education. With the spread of inventions leading to modern industry, the domestic system broke down and there grew a sharp demand for scientific methods in all skilled branches of industry.

Scientific methods could come only by a higher type of scientific or technical education acquired in various forms.
Thus, now industry is taught of its two aspects of skilled and unskilled labour, words which might equally connote aspects of industry for the well-educated and the uneducated respectively.


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The skilled branches of industry are very many and entail mental vigour and delicacy in training to produce maximum turn out as well as exactness and fineness in production, with the least wastage of materials, time, money and human and industrial energy. Unless a special apprentice system is afforded to workmen, this stage is unattained by very many workmen. Even the full apprentice system has its many draw-backs unless the would-be apprentice is capable of manipulation of figures and calculations, which are again possible only with some general education.


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One of the modern features of any industry is the chemical and analytical department or laboratory. Here, men trained in technical colleges and universities and have acquired the training in science, work out new processes to a successful industrial machinery. Some again design new patterns of industrial workshops and new machines to conserve human energy.

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Most young men entering industrial concerns are expected to pass through junior technical schools and technical colleges. Her, clerical work and commercial methods, and knowledge of the various trades are taught.

Contact with foreign commercial and industrial concerns is another aspect of modern industry. This would entail a good knowledge not only of the language of a particular country but also of its industrial and commercial methods. The science of economics must be studied so that competition with foreign industries for markets could be effectively tackled. There seems to be no other royal road to the attainment of this than an effective and well-grounded education by preparing men and women for such problems of the commercial world.

Industries cannot be built without the science of organisation. The born organiser might achieve much but then few there are of this group. Sociology and industrial psychology have to be studied in order to avoid and eliminate a far as possible fatigue, wastage, and disaffection.

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The clerk, the secretary, the salesman, the chemist, the analyst, the manager, all need special training to fit them for their jobs and, the fundamentals are imparted only by EDUCATION.


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