Fungi Friday - A Swamp Full of Suilus

in Fungi Lovers5 months ago

Happy Fungi Friday Fungi Lovers!

Today, I'm bringing you all some pictures from my most recent hike. Earlier this week, I made my way to a swampy wetland surrounded by mixed stands of red pine, maple, oak, and a smattering of eastern hemlock trees. In fact, it was the hemlock trees that attracted me to this particular area that day. I had decided to hunt for one fungi in particular, the Hemlock Varnish Shelf (Ganoderma tsugae), a highly valued medicinal species known to fruit exclusively from eastern hemlock trees.

Though I was unsuccessful in finding my coveted varnish shelf on this trip, I did not leave the woods disappointed. I was treated to wide variety of vividly colorful and peculiarly shaped fungi on this trip, the most notable being a large collection of Painted Suilus (Suillus spraguei) mushrooms fruiting just off the boardwalk I was using to traverse the boggy swampland. These bright fungi are well-deserving of their name as the streaks of red that adorn their caps and stem truly do look like delicate brush marks contrasted against the pale yellow flesh beneath.

Other exciting finds for me included finding the Salmon Pinkgills (Entoloma quadratum) and Orange Earthtongues (Microglossum rufum,) as these were my first encounters with these species, as well as the Beech Rooter (Oudemansiella furfuracea) since I was able to yank it out from the ground while still keeping much of its characteristically deep taproot intact.

Despite not having come across my desired prize on this mushroom hunt, I certainly did not leave empty-handed. Please feel free to offer your suggestions if you believe that I had misidentified any of the species shown below. Happy Fungi Friday!

Painted Suillus (Suillus spraguei):

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Shiny Cinnamon Polypore (Coltricia cinnamomea):

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Smoky Polypore (Bjerkandera adusta):

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Eastern American Platterful Mushroom (Megacollybia rodmanii):

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Blackfoot Polypore (Cerioporus leptocephalus):

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Goblet Waxcap (Hygrocybe cantharellus):

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Pinewood Gingertail (Xeromphalina campanella):

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Orange Earthtongue (Microglossum rufum):

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Tender Nesting Polypore (Hapalopilus rutilans):

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Dryad's Saddle (Cerioporus squamosus):

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Artist's Bracket (Ganoderma applanatum):

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Salmon Pinkgill (Entoloma quadratum):

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Orange Gilled Waxcap (Humidicutis marginata):

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Frost's Bolete(Exsudoporus frostii):

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Beech Rooter (Oudemansiella furfuracea):
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Turkey-Tail (Trametes versicolor):

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Common Puffball (Lycoperdon perlatum):

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Red-cracking Bolete (Xerocomellus chrysenteron):

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Black Knot (Apiosporina morbosa):

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Jellied False Coral Fungus (Sebacina schweinitzii):

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Brittlegills (Genus Russula):

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Boletes and Allies (Order Boletales):

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Dog Vomit Slime Mold (Fuligo septica):

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Wolf's Milk (Lycogala epidendrum):

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Red Raspberry Slime Mold (Tubifera ferruginosa):

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Chocolate Tube Slime (Stemonitis splendens):

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The frostii bolete is said to be a good edible mushroom. Also thanks for the ID on Suillus spraguei, I have only found that in the state of Michigan and always wondered what in the world it is. Seems part polypore, part bolete.

You're very welcome! I didn't bring a basket with me on this walk, so I didn't end up harvesting any of these to bring home. I'm also not very confident on how to cook most species. I know some require very particular handling to make them edible.

The frostii boletes are sold in markets down in Mexico. They just need to be fully cooked. No need to do parboiling.

Wow !! Amazing all your captures and your knowledge about mushrooms! I would love for you to be here to go out for a walk in the forest, there are many of the species that your photographs of you, or perhaps they are similar, for example Rusulas and those other small white balls, I simply do not know their toxicity as for collection and consumption . I admire those who know all that! Thanks for your post!! 😊

The Russulas are notoriously difficult to ID. Some are choice edibles, but others will definitely make you sick. There are dozens if not hundreds of very similar looking red russula mushrooms all over the world. The only other technique I'm aware of to narrow down what they may be is to bite off a tiny corner of the cap, chew it for a few seconds, and then spit the flesh out. Some red russulas are bland tasting, but others are spicy (almost like cayenne pepper). If I'm not mistaken, the spicy taste is more closely associated with the species known to cause gastrointestinal distress.

There are dozens if not hundreds of very similar looking red russula mushrooms all over the world.

The only other technique I'm aware of to narrow down what they may be is to bite off a tiny corner of the cap

I could not but agree with you, with both statements!

:)

I understand, your information is very interesting. As soon as I upload the material that I have, I will enchant you so that you find out and tell me a little about what you know, I really like this type of interaction!! I send you a hug and a piece of pizza!!
!PIZZA

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impressive work on getting all the IDs. awesome post, supported by FL account upvote and nominated for #OCD curation. if you like what community is about, please consider adding FL community as beneficiary of your future posts. thanks!

I will! Thank you!

Such mushrooms do not grow in our forests, at first I thought it was a honey mushroom, until I read the post)).