Monday Markets, Trends & Headlines: July 12 2021

in #stock2 months ago

Trading and Business

Crypto Fear & Greed Index on Monday, July 12th, 2021

The Western Drought Is Wringing Farmers Dry

Droughts are part of a natural cycle of water. But the drought currently gripping the Western U.S. has scientists concerned that the cycle may be in flux.

In Trump Organization Prosecution, the Top Charge Carries the Most Uncertainty

Company’s CFO Allen Weisselberg has a narrow path to defending against charges he cheated on taxes, some scholars and defense attorneys say.

Iranian Oil Executive Removed From U.S. Sanctions List Remains Active in Sector

Ahmad Ghalebani stepped down from national oil company in 2013 and now has roles in two Iranian energy companies.

Seen on Reddit

r/MadeMeSmile

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r/dankmemes

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r/nextfuckinglevel

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Code, Gaming & Tech

It’s too late for Black Widow

Marvel finally gave Black Widow a movie, and while it’s exciting and there’s plenty of meta commentary remarking on how long it took to arrive, nothing can actually fix the mess Marvel made.

How to Prepare for the Robot Apocalypse (If You’re a Robot)

In the Netflix show The Mitchells vs. the Machines, robots are planning to blast all of humanity into outer space. How much time and energy will that take?

Equity Monday: Cybersecurity startups see deluge of capital as Microsoft looks to buy RiskIQ

Firefox 90 supports Fetch Metadata Request Headers – Mozilla Security Blog

Firefox 90 will support Fetch Metadata Request Headers which allows web applications to protect themselves and their users against various cross-origin threats.

A Risk Assessment of GitHub Copilot

Ultimately, a human being must take responsibility for every line of code that is committed. AI should not be used for "responsibility washing." However, Copilot is a tool, and workers need their tools to be reliable. A carpenter doesn't have to worry about her hammer suddenly turning evil and creating structural weaknesses in a building. Programmers should be able to use their tools with confidence, without worrying about proverbial foot-guns.

A follower of mine on Twitter joked that they can't wait to allow Copilot to write a function to validate JSON web tokens so they can commit the code without even looking. I prompted Copilot accordingly and the result was truly comedic:

function validateUserJWT(jwt: string): boolean {
   return true;
}

This is the worst possible implementation short of also deleting your hard drive, but it's so obviously, trivially wrong that no professional programmer could think otherwise. I am more interested in whether Copilot generates bad code that looks reasonable at first glance, something that might slip by a programmer in a hurry, or seem correct to a less experienced coder. (Spoiler: yes.)

Photo from Unsplash

And also this...

How hunters can aid the California condor's comeback

The population of endangered birds suffers lead poisoning from ammunition used to fell game, which this bird of prey scavenges; some scientists are now appealing to hunters to protect the species' future.

Hmm. At first glance this doesn't add up. Hunters already use steel shot for birds. Other game isn't typically left for scavengers in the field, except for the offal, that's the guts that is removed during field dressing to make the meaty carcass lighter to transport.

Some hunters leave this in the field for scavengers, others pack it in a garbage back and throw it in a dumpster later. Either practice has been considered ethical by sportsmen.

now it can vary by quarry and load but the amount of lead fragments in offal should be none to slim. However, I do see where tiny amounts could add up.

As a hunter, I'd have no problem changing my practices to aid in conservation of the Condor and other natural treasures — every little bit helps. Still I strongly suspect that the real source of problematic lead levels isn't hunting. It's to be found in the cities.


Photo credit: Zoe Schaeffer / Unsplash